MYSTERY: BABYLON THE GREAT

They might be giants

I’m your only friend
I’m not your only friend
But I’m a little glowing friend
But really I’m not actually your friend
But I am

Blue canary in the outlet by the light switch
Who watches over you
Make a little birdhouse in your soul
Not to put too fine a point on it
Say I’m the only bee in your bonnet
Make a little birdhouse in your soul

I have a secret to tell
From my electrical well
It’s a simple message and I’m leaving out the whistles and bells
So the room must listen to me
Filibuster vigilantly
My name is blue canary one note* spelled l-i-t-e
My story’s infinite
Like the Longines Symphonette it doesn’t rest

Blue canary in the outlet by the light switch
Who watches over you
Make a little birdhouse in your soul
Not to put too fine a point on it
Say I’m the only bee in your bonnet
Make a little birdhouse in your soulI’m your only friend
I’m not your only friend
But I’m a little glowing friend
But really I’m not actually your friend
But I amThere’s a picture opposite me
Of my primitive ancestry
Which stood on rocky shores and kept the beaches shipwreck free
Though I respect that a lot
I’d be fired if that were my job
After killing Jason off and countless screaming Argonauts
Bluebird of friendliness
Like guardian angels its always nearBlue canary in the outlet by the light switch
Who watches over you
Make a little birdhouse in your soul
Not to put too fine a point on it
Say I’m the only bee in your bonnet
Make a little birdhouse in your soul(And while you’re at it
Keep the nightlight on inside the
Birdhouse in your soul)Not to put too fine a point on it
Say I’m the only bee in your bonnet
Make a little birdhouse in your soul

Blue canary in the outlet by the light switch (and while you’re at it)
Who watches over you (keep the nightlight on inside the)
Make a little birdhouse in your soul (birdhouse in your soul)Not to put too fine a point on it
Say I’m the only bee in your bonnet
Make a little birdhouse in your soulBlue canary in the outlet by the light switch (and while you’re at it)
Who watches over you (keep the nightlight on inside the)
Make a little birdhouse in your soul (birdhouse in your soul)

Not to put too fine a point on it
Say I’m the only bee in your bonnet
Make a little birdhouse in your soul

A forest of dead woods. They might be giants.

Prayer in a wounded soul that inflicts on the body it’s ugly nature and horrid pain, storing the past forever and projecting it back to the future and a damnation that history must repeat itself, over snd over until the rising madness consumes the nerves to the very bone and heart until it loses the will to beat, to beat its thoughts of cancer, alcoholism, unmentionable confusing pain and the heart simply to beat without a drug, a pill, an injection. Jealousy of the sleep – no mystery to my existence, an unforetold passing, endless lament.

Babylon the Great – Hoping for a Miracle in Samuel Menashe’s Poem, “Bread.”


Menashe wrote a poem with an air of humility and sadness, powerlessness and the faith of the desperate, called “Bread.” In the poem, the speaker drops a profuse amount of bread into a body of water, reminding the reader of Jesus’ act of feeding the crowd upon the shore with the loaves and fishes. This could be an example of having been taught to fish, so that as in the old proverb, “Give a man a fish, he will eat for a week, but teach a man to fish, and he will eat for life.” However, “Bread,” representative of the body of Christ, does not illustrate that there were fish in the sea. The actions of the speaker were symbolic, and he was throwing bread into a sea which contains little life, hoping for a resurrection.
John 3:65 says, “I am the bread of life. Whomever comes to me will never be hungry again.” Most scholars indicate bread of life to be redemption from deadly sin, in this context I am using this statement to indicate Jesus’ resurrection. The poem leads one to experience an air of mystery about why the need is so urgent to feed fish that never manifest, and the urgency could manifest about losing someone dear, perhaps a family member. The Ichthys is a symbol for Jesus and the Bible says, “Jesus answered, see to it that no one deceives you. For many will come in my name and will deceive many. You will hear of wars and rumors of wars, in but see to it that you are not alarmed. These things must happen, but the end is still to come.…” (Matthew 24:5) This is considered one of the ends of the age. If the Christs’ were represented by fish, the bread would have drawn them rapidly, alas we have one sea without fish. Throwing bread into the sea in profuse amounts, indicated by the lines in the poem, would give the speaker the allusion that there were many souls not saved, many Christs not resurrected. Any living thing in the sea has died, and there is no big fish that represents your kin in the sea – a big fish that would consume profuse amounts of bread. If Jesus Christ can be resurrected, then many can, as many will come in his name. In this poem this illustrates the boys faith in God, to draw the Ichthys’ to him and feed it the bread of life, as in, “Thy Will be Done,” and the triumphant story of the second coming.
The boy is hoping for magnificent display of Gods power and displaying a desire for a miracle to happen, a loved one to be drawn to his offering. Crust by crumb he makes the offering, hoping for the proverbial Jonah’s’ Whale which will show him divine love, divine will, divine mercy on his loved ones.
Citations
Menashe, Samuel. “Bread.” Backpack Literature: An Introduction to Fiction, Poetry,

Drama, and Writing, Pearson, 2012

Holy Bible, English Standard Version

Hoping for a Miracle in Samuel Menashe’s Poem, “Bread.”

Menashe wrote a poem with an air of humility and sadness, powerlessness and the faith of the desperate, called “Bread.” In the poem, the speaker drops a profuse amount of bread into a body of water, reminding the reader of Jesus’ act of feeding the crowd upon the shore with the loaves and fishes. This could be an example of having been taught to fish, so that as in the old proverb, “Give a man a fish, he will eat for a week, but teach a man to fish, and he will eat for life.”  However, “Bread,” representative of the body of Christ, does not illustrate that there were fish in the sea. The actions of the speaker were symbolic, and he was throwing bread into a sea which contains little life, hoping for a resurrection.

John 3:65 says, “I am the bread of life. Whomever comes to me will never be hungry again.” Most scholars indicate bread of life to be redemption from deadly sin, in this context I am using this statement to indicate Jesus’ resurrection. The poem leads one to experience an air of mystery about why the need is so urgent to feed fish that never manifest, and the urgency could manifest about losing someone dear, perhaps a family member. The Ichthys is a symbol for Jesus and the Bible says, “Jesus answered, see to it that no one deceives you.  For many will come in my name and will deceive many. You will hear of wars and rumors of wars, in but see to it that you are not alarmed. These things must happen, but the end is still to come.…” (Matthew 24:5)  This is considered one of the ends of the age. If the Christs’ were represented by fish, the bread would have drawn them rapidly, alas we have one sea without fish. Throwing bread into the sea in profuse amounts, indicated by the lines in the poem, would give the speaker the allusion that there were many souls not saved, many Christs not resurrected. Any living thing in the sea has died, and there is no big fish that represents your kin in the sea – a big fish that would consume profuse amounts of bread. If Jesus Christ can be resurrected, then many can, as many will come in his name. In this poem this illustrates the boys faith in God, to draw the Ichthys’ to him and feed it the bread of life, as in, “Thy Will be Done,” and the triumphant story of the second coming.

The boy is hoping for magnificent display of Gods power and displaying a desire for a miracle to happen, a loved one to be drawn to his offering. Crust by crumb he makes the offering, hoping for the proverbial Jonah’s’ Whale which will show him divine love, divine will, divine mercy on his loved ones.

Babylon the Great

Babylon the many verses

BABYLON – the great babblefish

Babylon kings and queens, drinking wrath and fornication

Published by: Elaine M

I’m a magical 44 year old who bargains she will experience joy and happiness someday and has aversion to the great pain and suffering from the past, who longs for the enlightenment of all in a gentle and loving way.

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